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The Science of Stopping Slipping Eyeglasses

Are Eyeglass Straps, Eyeglass Cords, Eyeglass Chains, and Eyeglass Lanyards Dangerous?

3 Minutes of reading may save your life...

Before you go ahead and buy those eyeglass straps, eyeglass cords, eyeglass chains, or eyeglass lanyards you had your eye on, take a few minutes to read this article on the dangers of rope type eyeglass retainers. The next few minutes might just help you avoid serious injury or accidental death.

First of all, by rope type eyeglass retainers we refer to the group of eyeglass accessories known as eyeglass straps, eyeglass cords, eyeglass chains, and eyeglass lanyards.


They are nearly identical in characteristics, differing mainly in what they’re made of.

Eyeglass straps are usually made of neoprene, eyeglass cords and eyeglass lanyards are usually made of natural or synthetic cloth, eyeglass chains are usually made of hard plastic or metal.

Why people buy eyeglass straps, cords, chains, lanyards...

 First, to prevent their eyeglasses from slipping down their nose.

Second, to keep eyeglasses in a handy location when not worn, namely attached to the retainer, resting on one’s chest.

How they work...

These rope style eyeglass retainers all work the same way. One end of the rope style retainer attaches to the left temple arm of your glasses while the other end attaches to the right temple arm.

While you are wearing your glasses, the rope retainer hangs off the back of your neck.

And it is precisely the fact that they dangle off the back of your neck which makes eyeglass straps, eyeglass cords, eyeglass chains, and eyeglass lanyards so especially dangerous.

Take a minute to answer the following question?

What would be the danger of having long untied hair while working around heavy machinery?

Picture a man or woman with hair past their shoulders working around a piece of heavy equipment, a printing press for example or a rubber extruder. Basically a large machine with lots of cogs and moving parts.

Precisely.

As you can visualize, long hair might get caught in the moving parts of the machine.

Actually for anyone who’s taken “shop class” also known as Industrial Arts in high school, you might remember the shop teacher expressly warning you to tie up long hair, remove loose jewelry, and even secure long sleeves around machinery. It was as serious then as it is now. People can get seriously hurt or even killed when loose items and objects get caught or entangled.

In much the same way, eyeglass straps, cords, chains, and lanyards can get caught in moving parts as well.

There are dangers everywhere...

Even if you don’t work in a factory or around heavy machinery, there are lots of moving things that your rope-like retainers can get caught on such as a closing door or stationary things you catch onto while you yourself are moving such as a hook or any type of protrusion. Or often, the retainer gets caught either purposely (bullying or a practical joke) or accidentally (gesturing or waving an object) by a human agent.

Even the companies selling these products warn of their danger!

Warnings of such dangers are even provided by the companies who sell such products on the Internet.

Below are examples from four different eyewear retainer ecommerce sites. For each example, a screen shot of the web page is provided, along with a close-up highlighting the danger warning, followed by the URL of the page, as well as a webcitation.org URL of the page as it appeared during the period this study was compiled in the event that warnings are removed from the actual pages as a result of this study which exposes the dangers of eyeglass straps, eyeglass cords, eyeglass chains, and eyeglass lanyards. 

 

 

 

 

Reference to the original site is:

http://www.am-safety.com/GroupInfo/GroupID/9430

In the event that the original site has been altered, a web snapshot from webcitation.org, a trusted source for site archiving, shows the page as it was displayed at the time of this article.

http://www.webcitation.org/65FD3jgq1

 

 

 

 

 

Reference to the original site is:

http://www.ehow.com/facts_5721651_lanyards-safety.html

In the event that the original site has been altered, a web snapshot from webcitation.org, a trusted source for site archiving, shows the page as it was displayed at the time of this article.

http://www.webcitation.org/65JqjNIyw 

 

 

 

  

Reference to the original site is:

http://www.andersons-online.com/AdvSearch/Section/Safety_Glasses_Eyewear_and_Goggle_Cords_109903 

In the event that the original site has been altered, a web snapshot from webcitation.org, a trusted source for site archiving, shows the page as it was displayed at the time of this article. 

http://www.webcitation.org/65Jr38dW4 

 

Reference to the original site is:

http://www.northernsafety.com/Product/22851/N-Specs-Safety-Eyewear-Breakaway-Cotton-Safety-Glasses-Neck-Cord-Retainers

In the event that the original site has been altered, a web snapshot from webcitation.org, a trusted source for site archiving, shows the page as it was displayed at the time of this article.

http://www.webcitation.org/65Jr9ZUVS

An interesting side note is that many companies are now selling eyeglass straps, cords, chains, and lanyards with so-called breakaway design safety features meaning that if your retainers does get caught in machinery, you can break-free. While it sounds practical, the best strategy is to avoid getting tangled, trapped, or caught in the first place.

Worst-case Scenario (not for the easily frightened)...

Yanking you backwards, gears gnashing like God's teeth, you're stuck in something but your mind has no time for expressing words.

All executive function has just been passed to your reptilian brain, the most ancient part of you because before you're able to consciously analyze what the danger source is, your central nervous system already "knows" death is just seconds away. A very violent death at that.

You're on the verge of losing balance and the sound of looming machinery behind you screams like babies being ripped with bandsaws. But even that sound seems faint compared to your own jackhammering heart beating like a hail storm pelting fist-sized rocks without mercy on a car windshield.

And yet only three seconds have passed.

Contrary to what you've been told your life does not flash before your eyes. Only that you see sounds and you hear colors and everything in your head is an electrical fire of activity.

Then all of a sudden a buzzer goes off and the pulling stops. Nothing makes sense and you slump to the floor. The foreman and your line buddy who pressed the emergency stop button come running to your side.

A Safe Alternative to Rope-style Eyeglass Retainers

So what do you do if you need the functionality of rope-style eyeglass retainers but want to avoid the inherent dangers posed by wearing such devices?

A safe alternative is eyeglass retainer attachments. They come in a pair and are not joined by any type of rope section. Below you’ll find a photo of just such an accessory which slides on your eyeglass frame temples and once in place, stop your eyeglasses from slipping.


The most famous and largest brand of such eyeglass retainer attachments are known as Keepons. An added benefit of Keepons is that they’re engineered from transparent silicone so that no one will notice you’re wearing them. This is the Keepons eyewear retainer website